All posts by thefilm.blog

The 10 Best Film Posters of 2018

As another year draws to a close, it’s time to kick off the annual rankings. First up, here are our top film posters of 2018 – let us know if you agree in the comments!

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Roma | Review

★★★★★

With little fanfare, and certainly no warning, Roma draws you in, lulls you, charms you and thoroughly destroys you. This is the first Spanish-language film by Alfonso Cuarón since 2001 and is without question the most personal the Mexican director has ever made. A stunning recreation of Cuarón own childhood, Roma is quietly mesmerising and profoundly affecting.

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Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse | Review

★★★★

Unexpectedly, this latest Spider-feature – the hero’s first to be animated – has taken up the mantle of legacy and epitaph. Released in the same year the creative world lost both Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, Into the Spider-Verse celebrates the friendly neighbourhood character their collaboration gave birth to back in 1962 and does so in style. The best Spider-Man film since 2004? You bet.

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30 films to get you excited for 2019

With mere weeks left of 2018, a new year of cinema beckons. And, boy, has it got us excited!

There are new films from Jordan Peele, Quentin Tarantino and Barry Jenkins; new entries in the Avengers, Jumanji and Star Wars franchises; and even an upscale for popular TV show Downton Abbey.

Following on from our list of most-anticipated animated films, we now present thirty live-action features that we can’t wait to see in 2019…

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Mortal Engines | Review

★★★

Mortal Engines roars into action with so exhilarating, if wildly chaotic, an opening that expectation cannot help but hit an early high. This is, after all, a production billed as being from the makers of Lord of the Rings. Whereas such vibrance is retained in the film’s pace and visual spectacle, however, the fluctuating energy of its storytelling can’t help but slightly disappoint. 

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