Category Archives: Steven Allison

Paris Is Us | Review

★★★★

There are no words to describe Paris Is Us. Actually, that’s a lie. Musician Simon Boswell’s album title applies perfectly to this new Netflix feature: ‘It’s horrible. I love it. What is it?’ Paris is Us isn’t a love-or-hate sort of affair; it’s both, with a whole load of confusion on top.

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Capernaum | Review

★★★★★

You may have heard in recent news about the Indian man threatening to sue his parents for giving birth to him without his consent. Raphael Samuel believes it to be wrong to bring children into the lifelong suffering of the world. His stunt seeks to promote anti-natalism, a philosophy based on the idea that, because life is so miserable, procreation should cease immediately. If you think this is insane, watch Capernaum.

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Sorry Angel | Review

★★★★

On occasion, it’s a real test of strength to endorse certain films. That’s not because they’re utter tripe, but because they manage to pull off tackling tough topics with such a blithe ease that it seems a bit wrong on a human level to recommend them. Sorry Angel is one such film but it has absolutely nothing to apologise for.

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The Kindergarten Teacher | Review

★★★★

A fuss was made recently about The Upside, an American remake of foreign-language film Les Intouchables. Few saw its purpose, given the success of the well-loved original, but I took exception. While I appreciated many aspects of the French version, I also understand that films not in the English language don’t feel accessible for everyone. Many people simply don’t have the tolerance required for subtitles or dubbing, which is okay. There has been a comparable hoo-ha about Sara Colangelo’s The Kindergarten Teacher, a largely faithful remake of critically-acclaimed Israeli film Haganenet. To those up in arms, I say: why can’t we just enjoy both?

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The Upside | Review

★★★★

In light of the abysmal critical reception that has met The Upside, you’d be forgiven for thinking that it was a scarlet woman returning to a party after being caught fellating the hostess’ husband in the bathroom. Countless reviews have lambasted this remake of 2011 French buddy comedy-drama The Intouchables. Also inspired by the life of Phillipe Pozzo di Borgo, Neil Burger’s The Upside traces the developing relationship between Phillip Lacasse (Bryan Cranston), a quadriplegic billionaire, and Dell Scott (Kevin Hart), his young, recently paroled African-American carer. Critics opine that this flat offering is just as flawed as its predecessor, coming off as even more mawkish and basic, while simultaneously failing to exhibit any of its abundant charm.

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Holmes & Watson | Review

Holmes & Watson is easily the best film made in 2018. Ah, ok, you’ve caught me in a lie. It is, in fact, one of the biggest flops of the year. It’s absolutely no wonder that the press weren’t given a sneak peek of the movie before its release because it would have been akin to throwing a defenceless, bleating lamb to a pack of ravenous, salivating wolves. It’s elementary, my dear viewers; this purportedly humorous – and I use that word very loosely – take on Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mysteries, featuring observant fictional detective Sherlock Holmes and his faithful sidekick John Watson, is a load of tosh. Holmes & Watson is a proverbial slap in the face for deep-dyed fans of the original stories. It was a real struggle to reach the end.

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Three Identical Strangers | Review

★★★★

Tim Wardle’s mind-blowing, consistently watchable, documentary lays out the most incredibly twisty true story that I’ve heard in a long time. If it seems, at first, as though audiences will be treated to nothing more than a heart-warming tale of human connection against the odds, the breezy tone soon dissipates as we turn a corner towards something far more sinister. We soon realise that Three Identical Strangers is a ‘more than meets the eye’ allegory of immorality and corruption.

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