Tag Archives: Movie Review

Loving Vincent | Review

★★★★

By the time the opening titles of Loving Vincent come to a close, and the film itself begins, somewhere in the region of 1500 hand painted oil canvases, produced by professional artists and animators over the equivalent of perhaps 15-20 months will have glanced and glimmered across the screen. The result is, simply put, astonishing.

Continue reading Loving Vincent | Review

Advertisements

Martin | Inside Out

Pixar Animation Studios, a subsidiary of Walt Disney Animation Studios that almost always with each film they make, deliver to its audience some delights, whilst also on more than a few occasions, will have them wiping away tears. Over the years the studio has forged a reputation as one of the best in the business at making animated movies that are a delight for both kids and adults to enjoy. And very few films hit these notes, as beautifully, and as thought provokingly as Inside Out. 

The film tells the story of Riley, and the five little emotions that work away all day controlling her actions, thoughts and unsurprisingly her emotions. These emotions find themselves in turmoil when Riley and her folks are forced to move from Minnesota to San Francisco. The adverse effect this has on Riley, and consequently her emotions, makes for some entertaining dialogue and a really enjoyable film to watch. Above all, this is what makes this movie, extremely heartfelt, and quite simply a work of utter genius.

 

As human beings, we all experience emotions at various points in our lives. Whether we lose someone we love, get a job, get married, start our own families etc., these emotions are what make us human. We as humans have our good times, and the not-so-good moments. And though we do have more than just 5 solitary emotions, to have had more than 5 would have just felt like overkill. Perhaps a sequel one day will develop this further and utilise other emotions?

 

Anyway, for sure there are some moments in the film in which some of the characters, experience some heart-breaking realisations, two characters in particular. The voice work from everyone is tremendous but the five emotions especially Joy (Amy Poehler) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith) steal the show, but the others like Fear (Bill Hader), Disgust(Mindy Kaling), and last but not least Anger (Lewis Black) all have their moments to shine, and make you laugh.

 

The film is above all a realisation that in those moments in life where we’re down in the dumps and need someone to talk to, and no matter who you are, we have all had these moments. These messages will resonate with all who watch this movie. As no matter who we are, we’ve all had those times where we have been down in the dumps, and we just had to let the emotions out, and this film reminds you that sometimes that’s okay, because that’s part of being human.

 

This is what makes Inside Out above all a feel good film, though the film does have moments that feels like it’s ripping your heart right out of your chest. It’s well balanced by some truly brilliant humour, as well as the usual abundance of jokes that are aimed at the adults that will sail over the heads of the younger viewers. There’s a fun adventure to be had, that the kids will enjoy watching, but there’s so much more to this film than that.

 

I believe that Inside Out is one of those rare movies of the animated variety that are really aimed at the adults. It has themes and messages that will resonate more with the adults than with children, especially for any adults who have had children. You may laugh, and you will almost certainly cry, but that’s life in a nutshell, and once the credits begin to roll, you will find it hard not to have a massive smile on your face, not least because the credits themselves are ridiculously entertaining!

 

Read more from @ThrSilverScreen on his marvellous blog: throughthesilverscreen.com!

Click here to check out the rest of Feel Good CineSummer!

Cars 3 | Review

★★★

The Cars films have always felt a little like Pixar, the pioneering animation studio behind Toy Story, Up and last year’s Finding Dory, in the third rather than fifth gear.

Cars 3 is the second sequel to have spawned from the 2006 original; the third in a franchise that has, for over a decade now, whiffed somewhat disappointingly of commerce rather than creativity. With over $10bn banked already from merchandise alone, Cars has certainly proved itself to be a hugely profitable vehicle. The unfortunate result is a series that opportunistically loads each new film with fresh and disposable characters at the expense of developing old ones. Cars 3 won’t win over the naysayers – it’s got its predecessors’ rusts and some – but fans should be satisfied whilst those on the fence may find themselves surprisingly touched by the time the credits role. Naturally too – damn it Pixar – the animation itself is dazzling.

Continue reading Cars 3 | Review

Baby Driver | Review

★★★★★

Baby Driver’s been a passenger in the Edgar Wright career vehicle for over twenty years. Having conceived the concept – that of a getaway driver with a unique relationship to music – in the nineties, it was in directing the music video for Mint Royal’s ‘Blue Song’ that Wright first had a play. There Noel Fielding played the eponymous driver in an electrically entertaining four minute venture of boogieing to put shower singers to shame. Wright could quite easily have parked the idea there and then. What a sign, then, of his sheer brilliance and audacity as a director that he held on and has now produced something even more spectacular. Baby Driver is breathtaking. A film that will be treasured for generations to come.

Continue reading Baby Driver | Review

The Mummy | Review

★★

There’s a moment in Karl Freund’s original 1932 The Mummy – a then original feature designed to replicate the themes and successes of Universal’s contemporary horror films: Dracula, Frankenstein etc. – in which the Mummy himself (Boris Karloff playing Imhotep) is awoken from his sarcophagus slumber behind an unaware Ralph Norton (Bramwell Fletcher). It’s a scene that’s not quite as effective as it might have been but one that works by virtue of the brilliant tension of expectation that comes with viewers knowing exactly what is coming.

Continue reading The Mummy | Review